Bob Coats’ Guide to Political Activists

Commentary: Robert Coats

Perhaps few words are charged with more connotations that “activist” within the context of politics. The Forty-Five News talked to Montgomery County political strategist, Robert Coats, who gave us his list of the different kinds of political activists. Coats is the Area Chair for Montgomery, Precinct Chair of Pct. 77, and Senatorial District 3 Convention Chairman.

So without further ado, Robert Coats’ Guide to Political Activists:

“The following definitions I have formulated over the years. They are meant to be a reminder for not only myself, but all conservative political activists. Most of these are both positive and negative. I take pride in the first and third ones respectively as not some amalgamation of ideas synthesized in a political science type way. The Pigeon Activist is my favorite though for mostly hilarious reasons. Everywhere you go, there is this type of individual. The third are usually me and close friends when we or they get hung up on important issues. I hope their is a consensus that develops on Election Integrity issues nationwide, so I don’t have to be speaking on it for the next ten years, but who am I kidding. Since Tammany Hall, LBJ and Chicago’s Daley, and don’t forget Philly style walk-around cash. Democrats are the masters of this stuff and will find numerous ways to “find votes”. You see if this continues forever, and people stop listening to my clarion calls on these issues, I run the risk of potentially chasing the windmills of Cervantes classic portrayal of Don Quixote. I don’t include Sancho, because I don’t get why he is considered the sane one. He follows around a loon. Use these on occasion for self reflection and care, because no one else will do this for you my friends. It takes courage to point out our foibles. Don’t shoot the messenger.

Pigeon Activist—Someone, who not knowing all the facts of a political process
or situation, defecates all over the situation and people involved without
regard for the mess they make, i.e. Usually wealthy individuals who
engage in demagogic tactics, trying to be leader of the pack…often
uninformed

Gadfly—has oppositional defiance disorder which they usually bring into
any situation. Whatever anyone says, they have to say the opposite to
look like they matter too, i.e. “I’m playing devil’s advocate” and gives you
half baked scenarios to make themselves feel important without any real
discernable result.

Don Quixote—Always fights the noble battle that is over time and
time again. The hardest activist to fight because you agree with them
about the battle, but they have no strategy left. Chasing windmills
forever in their own minds.

Single Issue Activist-Sometimes successful on one single issue,
but rarely on electing their slate of Movement Conservatives. Why? They
forget that most people are not passionate on issues and they frighten
them away by their own militancy. The most common type in
Montgomery County, Texas. Always seems to snatch defeat from the
jaws of victory by rubbing in or alienating associational groups who were
not paying attention until you mentioned them.

True Activist/ Doer– This is the Jeannie Stephenson type. Who gives time
and treasure and is successful in getting true Conservatives elected
because she is a realist at her core and knows that when you sound
crazy—no one will listen, i.e. Has people skills with Establishment folks to
where she is put in charge of specific policies or candidates.

One thought on “Bob Coats’ Guide to Political Activists

  1. Bob,

    Am I understanding this correctly? The only type of activism that you value is activism that reaches out to the establishment?

    Sometimes that is beneficial Sometime it’s not. Especially if you are hoping to change something.

    I appreciate that is a good strategy at times. But in other situations you may need some Gadflys or Don Quixote to help on another political endeavor. I appreciate all you do for the conservative cause. But I don’t get the point of this email.

    Kelli

    >

    Like

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